list of fields/interests/languages. Your degree ofmastery of this whole field of antiques is irrelevant-unless you wantto work at a level in the field that demands and requires mastery.What are your favorite words? Every field has its own peculiarlanguage, vocabulary or jargon. What words or jargon do you like touse, or listen to, the most?To illustrate this, I'll freeze the job-title or skills, for a moment.I'll choose "secretary." By looking then at different kinds ofsecretary, we can see how favorite words can give you a helpful clueabout where you might like to find your dream job.For example, if you work as a legal secretary, you have to endure a lotof talk there, all day long, about legal procedures. Do you like thatvocabulary and language! If so, consider law as the field you mightwork in- for your next job or career.Again, if you work as a secretary at a gardening store, there's a lotof talk there, all day long, about gardens and such. Do you like thatvocabulary and language? If so, consider gardening as the field youmight work in--for your next job or career.If you work as a secretary at an airline, there's a lot of talk there,all day long, about airlines procedures and such. Do you like thatvocabulary and language? If so, consider the airlines as the field youmight work in-for your next job or career.If you work as a secretary at a church, there's a lot of talk there,all day long, about church procedures and matters of faith. Do youlike that vocabulary and language? If so, consider religion as thefield you might work in- for your next job or career.And so it continues. If you work as a secretary in a photographiclaboratory, there's a lot of talk there, all day long, aboutphotographic procedures. Do you like that vocabulary and language? Ifso, choose photography as the field you might work in- for your nextjob or career.Again, if you work as a secretary at a chemical plant, there's a lot oftalk there, all day long, about chemicals manufacturing. Do you likethat vocabulary and language? If so, consider the chemical industry asthe field you might work in- for your next job or career.If you work as a secretary for the Federal government, there's a lot oftalk there, all day long, about government procedures. Do you likethat vocabulary and language? If so, consider government work as thefield you might work in- for your next job or career.And so it goes. The point is not that you should be a secretary. Ijust froze the job-title and skills for a moment, so that you could seehow many different fields you might use those skills in.All of this proceeds from a simple intuition: the source of joy in yourdream job derives, to a great extent, from the fact that you enjoy thelanguage and vocabulary that you will be speaking or listening to allday long (provided, of course, that you also get to use your favoriteskills there).Whereas, if you don't enjoy the vocabulary or language that is spokenat work--you want to talk about gardening but you work at a place wherelaw (which has a vocabulary you hate) is what you have to

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very end, namely, salarynegotiation."In just two weeks I secured (you guessed it) two job offers, one ofwhich I am taking, as it is an excellent job, with very good pay. Itis (you guessed it again) a small company, with 20 or so employees. Itis also a career-change: I was a professor of English; now I am to be acontroller!"I am so glad I believed your advice: there are jobs out there, andthere are two types of employers out there, and truly there are!"I hope you will be happy to hear my story."EpilogueHow To Find Your Mission In LifeGod and One's VocationForewordAs I started writing this section, I toyed at first with the idea offollowing what might be described as an "all-paths approach" toreligion. But, after much thought, I decided not to try that. This,because I have read many other writers who tried, and I felt theapproach failed miserably. An "all-paths" approach to religion ends upbeing a "no-paths" approach, even as a woman or man who tries to pleaseeveryone ends up pleasing no one. It is the old story of the"universal" vs. the "particular."Those of us who do career counseling could predict, ahead of time, thattrying to stay universal is not likely to be helpful, in writing aboutreligion. We know well from our own field that truly helpful careercounseling depends upon defining the particularity or uniqueness ofeach person we try to help. No employer wants to know only what youhave in common with everyone else. He or she wants to know what makesyou unique and individual. As I have argued throughout this book, theidentification and inventory of your uniqueness or particularity iscrucial if you are ever to find meaningful work.This particularity invades and carries over to everything a persondoes; it is not suddenly jettison able when he or she turns toreligion. Therefore, when I or anyone else writes about religion Ibelieve we must write out of our own particularity- which starts, in mycase, with the fact that I write, and think, and breathe as a Christianas you might expect from the fact that I have been an ordainedEpiscopalian minister for the last forty-five years. Understandably,then, this article speaks from a Christian perspective. I want you tobe aware of that, at the outset.Balanced against this is the fact that I have always been acutelysensitive to the fact that this is a pluralistic society in which welive, and that I owe a great deal to my readers who may have religiousconvictions quite different from my own. It has turned out that thepeople who work or have worked here in my office with me, over theyears, have been predominantly of other faiths, mainly Jewish.Furthermore, Parachute's more than 7 million readers have not onlyincluded Christians of every variety and persuasion, ChristianScientists, Jews, members of the Baha'i faith, Hindus, Buddhists,adherents of Islam, but also believers in 'new age' religions,secularists, humanists, agnostics, atheists, and many others. I havetherefore tried to be very courteous toward the feelings of all myreaders, while at the same time counting on them to,bobo体育直播very end, namely, salarynegotiation."In just two weeks I secured (you guessed it) two job offers, one ofwhich I am taking, as it is an excellent job, with very good pay. Itis (you guessed it again) a small company, with 20 or so employees. Itis also a career-change: I was a professor of English; now I am to be acontroller!"I am so glad I believed your advice: there are jobs out there, andthere are two types of employers out there, and truly there are!"I hope you will be happy to hear my story."EpilogueHow To Find Your Mission In LifeGod and One's VocationForewordAs I started writing this section, I toyed at first with the idea offollowing what might be described as an "all-paths approach" toreligion. But, after much thought, I decided not to try that. This,because I have read many other writers who tried, and I felt theapproach failed miserably. An "all-paths" approach to religion ends upbeing a "no-paths" approach, even as a woman or man who tries to pleaseeveryone ends up pleasing no one. It is the old story of the"universal" vs. the "particular."Those of us who do career counseling could predict, ahead of time, thattrying to stay universal is not likely to be helpful, in writing aboutreligion. We know well from our own field that truly helpful careercounseling depends upon defining the particularity or uniqueness ofeach person we try to help. No employer wants to know only what youhave in common with everyone else. He or she wants to know what makesyou unique and individual. As I have argued throughout this book, theidentification and inventory of your uniqueness or particularity iscrucial if you are ever to find meaningful work.This particularity invades and carries over to everything a persondoes; it is not suddenly jettison able when he or she turns toreligion. Therefore, when I or anyone else writes about religion Ibelieve we must write out of our own particularity- which starts, in mycase, with the fact that I write, and think, and breathe as a Christianas you might expect from the fact that I have been an ordainedEpiscopalian minister for the last forty-five years. Understandably,then, this article speaks from a Christian perspective. I want you tobe aware of that, at the outset.Balanced against this is the fact that I have always been acutelysensitive to the fact that this is a pluralistic society in which welive, and that I owe a great deal to my readers who may have religiousconvictions quite different from my own. It has turned out that thepeople who work or have worked here in my office with me, over theyears, have been predominantly of other faiths, mainly Jewish.Furthermore, Parachute's more than 7 million readers have not onlyincluded Christians of every variety and persuasion, ChristianScientists, Jews, members of the Baha'i faith, Hindus, Buddhists,adherents of Islam, but also believers in 'new age' religions,secularists, humanists, agnostics, atheists, and many others. I havetherefore tried to be very courteous toward the feelings of all myreaders, while at the same time counting on them tovery end, namely, salarynegotiation."In just two weeks I secured (you guessed it) two job offers, one ofwhich I am taking, as it is an excellent job, with very good pay. Itis (you guessed it again) a small company, with 20 or so employees. Itis also a career-change: I was a professor of English; now I am to be acontroller!"I am so glad I believed your advice: there are jobs out there, andthere are two types of employers out there, and truly there are!"I hope you will be happy to hear my story."EpilogueHow To Find Your Mission In LifeGod and One's VocationForewordAs I started writing this section, I toyed at first with the idea offollowing what might be described as an "all-paths approach" toreligion. But, after much thought, I decided not to try that. This,because I have read many other writers who tried, and I felt theapproach failed miserably. An "all-paths" approach to religion ends upbeing a "no-paths" approach, even as a woman or man who tries to pleaseeveryone ends up pleasing no one. It is the old story of the"universal" vs. the "particular."Those of us who do career counseling could predict, ahead of time, thattrying to stay universal is not likely to be helpful, in writing aboutreligion. We know well from our own field that truly helpful careercounseling depends upon defining the particularity or uniqueness ofeach person we try to help. No employer wants to know only what youhave in common with everyone else. He or she wants to know what makesyou unique and individual. As I have argued throughout this book, theidentification and inventory of your uniqueness or particularity iscrucial if you are ever to find meaningful work.This particularity invades and carries over to everything a persondoes; it is not suddenly jettison able when he or she turns toreligion. Therefore, when I or anyone else writes about religion Ibelieve we must write out of our own particularity- which starts, in mycase, with the fact that I write, and think, and breathe as a Christianas you might expect from the fact that I have been an ordainedEpiscopalian minister for the last forty-five years. Understandably,then, this article speaks from a Christian perspective. I want you tobe aware of that, at the outset.Balanced against this is the fact that I have always been acutelysensitive to the fact that this is a pluralistic society in which welive, and that I owe a great deal to my readers who may have religiousconvictions quite different from my own. It has turned out that thepeople who work or have worked here in my office with me, over theyears, have been predominantly of other faiths, mainly Jewish.Furthermore, Parachute's more than 7 million readers have not onlyincluded Christians of every variety and persuasion, ChristianScientists, Jews, members of the Baha'i faith, Hindus, Buddhists,adherents of Islam, but also believers in 'new age' religions,secularists, humanists, agnostics, atheists, and many others. I havetherefore tried to be very courteous toward the feelings of all myreaders, while at the same time counting on them to,very end, namely, salarynegotiation."In just two weeks I secured (you guessed it) two job offers, one ofwhich I am taking, as it is an excellent job, with very good pay. Itis (you guessed it again) a small company, with 20 or so employees. Itis also a career-change: I was a professor of English; now I am to be acontroller!"I am so glad I believed your advice: there are jobs out there, andthere are two types of employers out there, and truly there are!"I hope you will be happy to hear my story."EpilogueHow To Find Your Mission In LifeGod and One's VocationForewordAs I started writing this section, I toyed at first with the idea offollowing what might be described as an "all-paths approach" toreligion. But, after much thought, I decided not to try that. This,because I have read many other writers who tried, and I felt theapproach failed miserably. An "all-paths" approach to religion ends upbeing a "no-paths" approach, even as a woman or man who tries to pleaseeveryone ends up pleasing no one. It is the old story of the"universal" vs. the "particular."Those of us who do career counseling could predict, ahead of time, thattrying to stay universal is not likely to be helpful, in writing aboutreligion. We know well from our own field that truly helpful careercounseling depends upon defining the particularity or uniqueness ofeach person we try to help. No employer wants to know only what youhave in common with everyone else. He or she wants to know what makesyou unique and individual. As I have argued throughout this book, theidentification and inventory of your uniqueness or particularity iscrucial if you are ever to find meaningful work.This particularity invades and carries over to everything a persondoes; it is not suddenly jettison able when he or she turns toreligion. Therefore, when I or anyone else writes about religion Ibelieve we must write out of our own particularity- which starts, in mycase, with the fact that I write, and think, and breathe as a Christianas you might expect from the fact that I have been an ordainedEpiscopalian minister for the last forty-five years. Understandably,then, this article speaks from a Christian perspective. I want you tobe aware of that, at the outset.Balanced against this is the fact that I have always been acutelysensitive to the fact that this is a pluralistic society in which welive, and that I owe a great deal to my readers who may have religiousconvictions quite different from my own. It has turned out that thepeople who work or have worked here in my office with me, over theyears, have been predominantly of other faiths, mainly Jewish.Furthermore, Parachute's more than 7 million readers have not onlyincluded Christians of every variety and persuasion, ChristianScientists, Jews, members of the Baha'i faith, Hindus, Buddhists,adherents of Islam, but also believers in 'new age' religions,secularists, humanists, agnostics, atheists, and many others. I havetherefore tried to be very courteous toward the feelings of all myreaders, while at the same time counting on them to,very end, namely, salarynegotiation."In just two weeks I secured (you guessed it) two job offers, one ofwhich I am taking, as it is an excellent job, with very good pay. Itis (you guessed it again) a small company, with 20 or so employees. Itis also a career-change: I was a professor of English; now I am to be acontroller!"I am so glad I believed your advice: there are jobs out there, andthere are two types of employers out there, and truly there are!"I hope you will be happy to hear my story."EpilogueHow To Find Your Mission In LifeGod and One's VocationForewordAs I started writing this section, I toyed at first with the idea offollowing what might be described as an "all-paths approach" toreligion. But, after much thought, I decided not to try that. This,because I have read many other writers who tried, and I felt theapproach failed miserably. An "all-paths" approach to religion ends upbeing a "no-paths" approach, even as a woman or man who tries to pleaseeveryone ends up pleasing no one. It is the old story of the"universal" vs. the "particular."Those of us who do career counseling could predict, ahead of time, thattrying to stay universal is not likely to be helpful, in writing aboutreligion. We know well from our own field that truly helpful careercounseling depends upon defining the particularity or uniqueness ofeach person we try to help. No employer wants to know only what youhave in common with everyone else. He or she wants to know what makesyou unique and individual. As I have argued throughout this book, theidentification and inventory of your uniqueness or particularity iscrucial if you are ever to find meaningful work.This particularity invades and carries over to everything a persondoes; it is not suddenly jettison able when he or she turns toreligion. Therefore, when I or anyone else writes about religion Ibelieve we must write out of our own particularity- which starts, in mycase, with the fact that I write, and think, and breathe as a Christianas you might expect from the fact that I have been an ordainedEpiscopalian minister for the last forty-five years. Understandably,then, this article speaks from a Christian perspective. I want you tobe aware of that, at the outset.Balanced against this is the fact that I have always been acutelysensitive to the fact that this is a pluralistic society in which welive, and that I owe a great deal to my readers who may have religiousconvictions quite different from my own. It has turned out that thepeople who work or have worked here in my office with me, over theyears, have been predominantly of other faiths, mainly Jewish.Furthermore, Parachute's more than 7 million readers have not onlyincluded Christians of every variety and persuasion, ChristianScientists, Jews, members of the Baha'i faith, Hindus, Buddhists,adherents of Islam, but also believers in 'new age' religions,secularists, humanists, agnostics, atheists, and many others. I havetherefore tried to be very courteous toward the feelings of all myreaders, while at the same time counting on them to

very end, namely, salarynegotiation."In just two weeks I secured (you guessed it) two job offers, one ofwhich I am taking, as it is an excellent job, with very good pay. Itis (you guessed it again) a small company, with 20 or so employees. Itis also a career-change: I was a professor of English; now I am to be acontroller!"I am so glad I believed your advice: there are jobs out there, andthere are two types of employers out there, and truly there are!"I hope you will be happy to hear my story."EpilogueHow To Find Your Mission In LifeGod and One's VocationForewordAs I started writing this section, I toyed at first with the idea offollowing what might be described as an "all-paths approach" toreligion. But, after much thought, I decided not to try that. This,because I have read many other writers who tried, and I felt theapproach failed miserably. An "all-paths" approach to religion ends upbeing a "no-paths" approach, even as a woman or man who tries to pleaseeveryone ends up pleasing no one. It is the old story of the"universal" vs. the "particular."Those of us who do career counseling could predict, ahead of time, thattrying to stay universal is not likely to be helpful, in writing aboutreligion. We know well from our own field that truly helpful careercounseling depends upon defining the particularity or uniqueness ofeach person we try to help. No employer wants to know only what youhave in common with everyone else. He or she wants to know what makesyou unique and individual. As I have argued throughout this book, theidentification and inventory of your uniqueness or particularity iscrucial if you are ever to find meaningful work.This particularity invades and carries over to everything a persondoes; it is not suddenly jettison able when he or she turns toreligion. Therefore, when I or anyone else writes about religion Ibelieve we must write out of our own particularity- which starts, in mycase, with the fact that I write, and think, and breathe as a Christianas you might expect from the fact that I have been an ordainedEpiscopalian minister for the last forty-five years. Understandably,then, this article speaks from a Christian perspective. I want you tobe aware of that, at the outset.Balanced against this is the fact that I have always been acutelysensitive to the fact that this is a pluralistic society in which welive, and that I owe a great deal to my readers who may have religiousconvictions quite different from my own. It has turned out that thepeople who work or have worked here in my office with me, over theyears, have been predominantly of other faiths, mainly Jewish.Furthermore, Parachute's more than 7 million readers have not onlyincluded Christians of every variety and persuasion, ChristianScientists, Jews, members of the Baha'i faith, Hindus, Buddhists,adherents of Islam, but also believers in 'new age' religions,secularists, humanists, agnostics, atheists, and many others. I havetherefore tried to be very courteous toward the feelings of all myreaders, while at the same time counting on them to,bob体育游戏下载安卓版very end, namely, salarynegotiation."In just two weeks I secured (you guessed it) two job offers, one ofwhich I am taking, as it is an excellent job, with very good pay. Itis (you guessed it again) a small company, with 20 or so employees. Itis also a career-change: I was a professor of English; now I am to be acontroller!"I am so glad I believed your advice: there are jobs out there, andthere are two types of employers out there, and truly there are!"I hope you will be happy to hear my story."EpilogueHow To Find Your Mission In LifeGod and One's VocationForewordAs I started writing this section, I toyed at first with the idea offollowing what might be described as an "all-paths approach" toreligion. But, after much thought, I decided not to try that. This,because I have read many other writers who tried, and I felt theapproach failed miserably. An "all-paths" approach to religion ends upbeing a "no-paths" approach, even as a woman or man who tries to pleaseeveryone ends up pleasing no one. It is the old story of the"universal" vs. the "particular."Those of us who do career counseling could predict, ahead of time, thattrying to stay universal is not likely to be helpful, in writing aboutreligion. We know well from our own field that truly helpful careercounseling depends upon defining the particularity or uniqueness ofeach person we try to help. No employer wants to know only what youhave in common with everyone else. He or she wants to know what makesyou unique and individual. As I have argued throughout this book, theidentification and inventory of your uniqueness or particularity iscrucial if you are ever to find meaningful work.This particularity invades and carries over to everything a persondoes; it is not suddenly jettison able when he or she turns toreligion. Therefore, when I or anyone else writes about religion Ibelieve we must write out of our own particularity- which starts, in mycase, with the fact that I write, and think, and breathe as a Christianas you might expect from the fact that I have been an ordainedEpiscopalian minister for the last forty-five years. Understandably,then, this article speaks from a Christian perspective. I want you tobe aware of that, at the outset.Balanced against this is the fact that I have always been acutelysensitive to the fact that this is a pluralistic society in which welive, and that I owe a great deal to my readers who may have religiousconvictions quite different from my own. It has turned out that thepeople who work or have worked here in my office with me, over theyears, have been predominantly of other faiths, mainly Jewish.Furthermore, Parachute's more than 7 million readers have not onlyincluded Christians of every variety and persuasion, ChristianScientists, Jews, members of the Baha'i faith, Hindus, Buddhists,adherents of Islam, but also believers in 'new age' religions,secularists, humanists, agnostics, atheists, and many others. I havetherefore tried to be very courteous toward the feelings of all myreaders, while at the same time counting on them to,very end, namely, salarynegotiation."In just two weeks I secured (you guessed it) two job offers, one ofwhich I am taking, as it is an excellent job, with very good pay. Itis (you guessed it again) a small company, with 20 or so employees. Itis also a career-change: I was a professor of English; now I am to be acontroller!"I am so glad I believed your advice: there are jobs out there, andthere are two types of employers out there, and truly there are!"I hope you will be happy to hear my story."EpilogueHow To Find Your Mission In LifeGod and One's VocationForewordAs I started writing this section, I toyed at first with the idea offollowing what might be described as an "all-paths approach" toreligion. But, after much thought, I decided not to try that. This,because I have read many other writers who tried, and I felt theapproach failed miserably. An "all-paths" approach to religion ends upbeing a "no-paths" approach, even as a woman or man who tries to pleaseeveryone ends up pleasing no one. It is the old story of the"universal" vs. the "particular."Those of us who do career counseling could predict, ahead of time, thattrying to stay universal is not likely to be helpful, in writing aboutreligion. We know well from our own field that truly helpful careercounseling depends upon defining the particularity or uniqueness ofeach person we try to help. No employer wants to know only what youhave in common with everyone else. He or she wants to know what makesyou unique and individual. As I have argued throughout this book, theidentification and inventory of your uniqueness or particularity iscrucial if you are ever to find meaningful work.This particularity invades and carries over to everything a persondoes; it is not suddenly jettison able when he or she turns toreligion. Therefore, when I or anyone else writes about religion Ibelieve we must write out of our own particularity- which starts, in mycase, with the fact that I write, and think, and breathe as a Christianas you might expect from the fact that I have been an ordainedEpiscopalian minister for the last forty-five years. Understandably,then, this article speaks from a Christian perspective. I want you tobe aware of that, at the outset.Balanced against this is the fact that I have always been acutelysensitive to the fact that this is a pluralistic society in which welive, and that I owe a great deal to my readers who may have religiousconvictions quite different from my own. It has turned out that thepeople who work or have worked here in my office with me, over theyears, have been predominantly of other faiths, mainly Jewish.Furthermore, Parachute's more than 7 million readers have not onlyincluded Christians of every variety and persuasion, ChristianScientists, Jews, members of the Baha'i faith, Hindus, Buddhists,adherents of Islam, but also believers in 'new age' religions,secularists, humanists, agnostics, atheists, and many others. I havetherefore tried to be very courteous toward the feelings of all myreaders, while at the same time counting on them tobob电竞体育平台

very end, namely, salarynegotiation."In just two weeks I secured (you guessed it) two job offers, one ofwhich I am taking, as it is an excellent job, with very good pay. Itis (you guessed it again) a small company, with 20 or so employees. Itis also a career-change: I was a professor of English; now I am to be acontroller!"I am so glad I believed your advice: there are jobs out there, andthere are two types of employers out there, and truly there are!"I hope you will be happy to hear my story."EpilogueHow To Find Your Mission In LifeGod and One's VocationForewordAs I started writing this section, I toyed at first with the idea offollowing what might be described as an "all-paths approach" toreligion. But, after much thought, I decided not to try that. This,because I have read many other writers who tried, and I felt theapproach failed miserably. An "all-paths" approach to religion ends upbeing a "no-paths" approach, even as a woman or man who tries to pleaseeveryone ends up pleasing no one. It is the old story of the"universal" vs. the "particular."Those of us who do career counseling could predict, ahead of time, thattrying to stay universal is not likely to be helpful, in writing aboutreligion. We know well from our own field that truly helpful careercounseling depends upon defining the particularity or uniqueness ofeach person we try to help. No employer wants to know only what youhave in common with everyone else. He or she wants to know what makesyou unique and individual. As I have argued throughout this book, theidentification and inventory of your uniqueness or particularity iscrucial if you are ever to find meaningful work.This particularity invades and carries over to everything a persondoes; it is not suddenly jettison able when he or she turns toreligion. Therefore, when I or anyone else writes about religion Ibelieve we must write out of our own particularity- which starts, in mycase, with the fact that I write, and think, and breathe as a Christianas you might expect from the fact that I have been an ordainedEpiscopalian minister for the last forty-five years. Understandably,then, this article speaks from a Christian perspective. I want you tobe aware of that, at the outset.Balanced against this is the fact that I have always been acutelysensitive to the fact that this is a pluralistic society in which welive, and that I owe a great deal to my readers who may have religiousconvictions quite different from my own. It has turned out that thepeople who work or have worked here in my office with me, over theyears, have been predominantly of other faiths, mainly Jewish.Furthermore, Parachute's more than 7 million readers have not onlyincluded Christians of every variety and persuasion, ChristianScientists, Jews, members of the Baha'i faith, Hindus, Buddhists,adherents of Islam, but also believers in 'new age' religions,secularists, humanists, agnostics, atheists, and many others. I havetherefore tried to be very courteous toward the feelings of all myreaders, while at the same time counting on them to,bob体育官方下载very end, namely, salarynegotiation."In just two weeks I secured (you guessed it) two job offers, one ofwhich I am taking, as it is an excellent job, with very good pay. Itis (you guessed it again) a small company, with 20 or so employees. Itis also a career-change: I was a professor of English; now I am to be acontroller!"I am so glad I believed your advice: there are jobs out there, andthere are two types of employers out there, and truly there are!"I hope you will be happy to hear my story."EpilogueHow To Find Your Mission In LifeGod and One's VocationForewordAs I started writing this section, I toyed at first with the idea offollowing what might be described as an "all-paths approach" toreligion. But, after much thought, I decided not to try that. This,because I have read many other writers who tried, and I felt theapproach failed miserably. An "all-paths" approach to religion ends upbeing a "no-paths" approach, even as a woman or man who tries to pleaseeveryone ends up pleasing no one. It is the old story of the"universal" vs. the "particular."Those of us who do career counseling could predict, ahead of time, thattrying to stay universal is not likely to be helpful, in writing aboutreligion. We know well from our own field that truly helpful careercounseling depends upon defining the particularity or uniqueness ofeach person we try to help. No employer wants to know only what youhave in common with everyone else. He or she wants to know what makesyou unique and individual. As I have argued throughout this book, theidentification and inventory of your uniqueness or particularity iscrucial if you are ever to find meaningful work.This particularity invades and carries over to everything a persondoes; it is not suddenly jettison able when he or she turns toreligion. Therefore, when I or anyone else writes about religion Ibelieve we must write out of our own particularity- which starts, in mycase, with the fact that I write, and think, and breathe as a Christianas you might expect from the fact that I have been an ordainedEpiscopalian minister for the last forty-five years. Understandably,then, this article speaks from a Christian perspective. I want you tobe aware of that, at the outset.Balanced against this is the fact that I have always been acutelysensitive to the fact that this is a pluralistic society in which welive, and that I owe a great deal to my readers who may have religiousconvictions quite different from my own. It has turned out that thepeople who work or have worked here in my office with me, over theyears, have been predominantly of other faiths, mainly Jewish.Furthermore, Parachute's more than 7 million readers have not onlyincluded Christians of every variety and persuasion, ChristianScientists, Jews, members of the Baha'i faith, Hindus, Buddhists,adherents of Islam, but also believers in 'new age' religions,secularists, humanists, agnostics, atheists, and many others. I havetherefore tried to be very courteous toward the feelings of all myreaders, while at the same time counting on them to

very end, namely, salarynegotiation."In just two weeks I secured (you guessed it) two job offers, one ofwhich I am taking, as it is an excellent job, with very good pay. Itis (you guessed it again) a small company, with 20 or so employees. Itis also a career-change: I was a professor of English; now I am to be acontroller!"I am so glad I believed your advice: there are jobs out there, andthere are two types of employers out there, and truly there are!"I hope you will be happy to hear my story."EpilogueHow To Find Your Mission In LifeGod and One's VocationForewordAs I started writing this section, I toyed at first with the idea offollowing what might be described as an "all-paths approach" toreligion. But, after much thought, I decided not to try that. This,because I have read many other writers who tried, and I felt theapproach failed miserably. An "all-paths" approach to religion ends upbeing a "no-paths" approach, even as a woman or man who tries to pleaseeveryone ends up pleasing no one. It is the old story of the"universal" vs. the "particular."Those of us who do career counseling could predict, ahead of time, thattrying to stay universal is not likely to be helpful, in writing aboutreligion. We know well from our own field that truly helpful careercounseling depends upon defining the particularity or uniqueness ofeach person we try to help. No employer wants to know only what youhave in common with everyone else. He or she wants to know what makesyou unique and individual. As I have argued throughout this book, theidentification and inventory of your uniqueness or particularity iscrucial if you are ever to find meaningful work.This particularity invades and carries over to everything a persondoes; it is not suddenly jettison able when he or she turns toreligion. Therefore, when I or anyone else writes about religion Ibelieve we must write out of our own particularity- which starts, in mycase, with the fact that I write, and think, and breathe as a Christianas you might expect from the fact that I have been an ordainedEpiscopalian minister for the last forty-five years. Understandably,then, this article speaks from a Christian perspective. I want you tobe aware of that, at the outset.Balanced against this is the fact that I have always been acutelysensitive to the fact that this is a pluralistic society in which welive, and that I owe a great deal to my readers who may have religiousconvictions quite different from my own. It has turned out that thepeople who work or have worked here in my office with me, over theyears, have been predominantly of other faiths, mainly Jewish.Furthermore, Parachute's more than 7 million readers have not onlyincluded Christians of every variety and persuasion, ChristianScientists, Jews, members of the Baha'i faith, Hindus, Buddhists,adherents of Islam, but also believers in 'new age' religions,secularists, humanists, agnostics, atheists, and many others. I havetherefore tried to be very courteous toward the feelings of all myreaders, while at the same time counting on them to,bob最新版下载地址,bob手机综合体育登录very end, namely, salarynegotiation."In just two weeks I secured (you guessed it) two job offers, one ofwhich I am taking, as it is an excellent job, with very good pay. Itis (you guessed it again) a small company, with 20 or so employees. Itis also a career-change: I was a professor of English; now I am to be acontroller!"I am so glad I believed your advice: there are jobs out there, andthere are two types of employers out there, and truly there are!"I hope you will be happy to hear my story."EpilogueHow To Find Your Mission In LifeGod and One's VocationForewordAs I started writing this section, I toyed at first with the idea offollowing what might be described as an "all-paths approach" toreligion. But, after much thought, I decided not to try that. This,because I have read many other writers who tried, and I felt theapproach failed miserably. An "all-paths" approach to religion ends upbeing a "no-paths" approach, even as a woman or man who tries to pleaseeveryone ends up pleasing no one. It is the old story of the"universal" vs. the "particular."Those of us who do career counseling could predict, ahead of time, thattrying to stay universal is not likely to be helpful, in writing aboutreligion. We know well from our own field that truly helpful careercounseling depends upon defining the particularity or uniqueness ofeach person we try to help. No employer wants to know only what youhave in common with everyone else. He or she wants to know what makesyou unique and individual. As I have argued throughout this book, theidentification and inventory of your uniqueness or particularity iscrucial if you are ever to find meaningful work.This particularity invades and carries over to everything a persondoes; it is not suddenly jettison able when he or she turns toreligion. Therefore, when I or anyone else writes about religion Ibelieve we must write out of our own particularity- which starts, in mycase, with the fact that I write, and think, and breathe as a Christianas you might expect from the fact that I have been an ordainedEpiscopalian minister for the last forty-five years. Understandably,then, this article speaks from a Christian perspective. I want you tobe aware of that, at the outset.Balanced against this is the fact that I have always been acutelysensitive to the fact that this is a pluralistic society in which welive, and that I owe a great deal to my readers who may have religiousconvictions quite different from my own. It has turned out that thepeople who work or have worked here in my office with me, over theyears, have been predominantly of other faiths, mainly Jewish.Furthermore, Parachute's more than 7 million readers have not onlyincluded Christians of every variety and persuasion, ChristianScientists, Jews, members of the Baha'i faith, Hindus, Buddhists,adherents of Islam, but also believers in 'new age' religions,secularists, humanists, agnostics, atheists, and many others. I havetherefore tried to be very courteous toward the feelings of all myreaders, while at the same time counting on them to

very end, namely, salarynegotiation."In just two weeks I secured (you guessed it) two job offers, one ofwhich I am taking, as it is an excellent job, with very good pay. Itis (you guessed it again) a small company, with 20 or so employees. Itis also a career-change: I was a professor of English; now I am to be acontroller!"I am so glad I believed your advice: there are jobs out there, andthere are two types of employers out there, and truly there are!"I hope you will be happy to hear my story."EpilogueHow To Find Your Mission In LifeGod and One's VocationForewordAs I started writing this section, I toyed at first with the idea offollowing what might be described as an "all-paths approach" toreligion. But, after much thought, I decided not to try that. This,because I have read many other writers who tried, and I felt theapproach failed miserably. An "all-paths" approach to religion ends upbeing a "no-paths" approach, even as a woman or man who tries to pleaseeveryone ends up pleasing no one. It is the old story of the"universal" vs. the "particular."Those of us who do career counseling could predict, ahead of time, thattrying to stay universal is not likely to be helpful, in writing aboutreligion. We know well from our own field that truly helpful careercounseling depends upon defining the particularity or uniqueness ofeach person we try to help. No employer wants to know only what youhave in common with everyone else. He or she wants to know what makesyou unique and individual. As I have argued throughout this book, theidentification and inventory of your uniqueness or particularity iscrucial if you are ever to find meaningful work.This particularity invades and carries over to everything a persondoes; it is not suddenly jettison able when he or she turns toreligion. Therefore, when I or anyone else writes about religion Ibelieve we must write out of our own particularity- which starts, in mycase, with the fact that I write, and think, and breathe as a Christianas you might expect from the fact that I have been an ordainedEpiscopalian minister for the last forty-five years. Understandably,then, this article speaks from a Christian perspective. I want you tobe aware of that, at the outset.Balanced against this is the fact that I have always been acutelysensitive to the fact that this is a pluralistic society in which welive, and that I owe a great deal to my readers who may have religiousconvictions quite different from my own. It has turned out that thepeople who work or have worked here in my office with me, over theyears, have been predominantly of other faiths, mainly Jewish.Furthermore, Parachute's more than 7 million readers have not onlyincluded Christians of every variety and persuasion, ChristianScientists, Jews, members of the Baha'i faith, Hindus, Buddhists,adherents of Islam, but also believers in 'new age' religions,secularists, humanists, agnostics, atheists, and many others. I havetherefore tried to be very courteous toward the feelings of all myreaders, while at the same time counting on them to,bobo体育投注very end, namely, salarynegotiation."In just two weeks I secured (you guessed it) two job offers, one ofwhich I am taking, as it is an excellent job, with very good pay. Itis (you guessed it again) a small company, with 20 or so employees. Itis also a career-change: I was a professor of English; now I am to be acontroller!"I am so glad I believed your advice: there are jobs out there, andthere are two types of employers out there, and truly there are!"I hope you will be happy to hear my story."EpilogueHow To Find Your Mission In LifeGod and One's VocationForewordAs I started writing this section, I toyed at first with the idea offollowing what might be described as an "all-paths approach" toreligion. But, after much thought, I decided not to try that. This,because I have read many other writers who tried, and I felt theapproach failed miserably. An "all-paths" approach to religion ends upbeing a "no-paths" approach, even as a woman or man who tries to pleaseeveryone ends up pleasing no one. It is the old story of the"universal" vs. the "particular."Those of us who do career counseling could predict, ahead of time, thattrying to stay universal is not likely to be helpful, in writing aboutreligion. We know well from our own field that truly helpful careercounseling depends upon defining the particularity or uniqueness ofeach person we try to help. No employer wants to know only what youhave in common with everyone else. He or she wants to know what makesyou unique and individual. As I have argued throughout this book, theidentification and inventory of your uniqueness or particularity iscrucial if you are ever to find meaningful work.This particularity invades and carries over to everything a persondoes; it is not suddenly jettison able when he or she turns toreligion. Therefore, when I or anyone else writes about religion Ibelieve we must write out of our own particularity- which starts, in mycase, with the fact that I write, and think, and breathe as a Christianas you might expect from the fact that I have been an ordainedEpiscopalian minister for the last forty-five years. Understandably,then, this article speaks from a Christian perspective. I want you tobe aware of that, at the outset.Balanced against this is the fact that I have always been acutelysensitive to the fact that this is a pluralistic society in which welive, and that I owe a great deal to my readers who may have religiousconvictions quite different from my own. It has turned out that thepeople who work or have worked here in my office with me, over theyears, have been predominantly of other faiths, mainly Jewish.Furthermore, Parachute's more than 7 million readers have not onlyincluded Christians of every variety and persuasion, ChristianScientists, Jews, members of the Baha'i faith, Hindus, Buddhists,adherents of Islam, but also believers in 'new age' religions,secularists, humanists, agnostics, atheists, and many others. I havetherefore tried to be very courteous toward the feelings of all myreaders, while at the same time counting on them tobob棋牌是真人的吗,very end, namely, salarynegotiation."In just two weeks I secured (you guessed it) two job offers, one ofwhich I am taking, as it is an excellent job, with very good pay. Itis (you guessed it again) a small company, with 20 or so employees. Itis also a career-change: I was a professor of English; now I am to be acontroller!"I am so glad I believed your advice: there are jobs out there, andthere are two types of employers out there, and truly there are!"I hope you will be happy to hear my story."EpilogueHow To Find Your Mission In LifeGod and One's VocationForewordAs I started writing this section, I toyed at first with the idea offollowing what might be described as an "all-paths approach" toreligion. But, after much thought, I decided not to try that. This,because I have read many other writers who tried, and I felt theapproach failed miserably. An "all-paths" approach to religion ends upbeing a "no-paths" approach, even as a woman or man who tries to pleaseeveryone ends up pleasing no one. It is the old story of the"universal" vs. the "particular."Those of us who do career counseling could predict, ahead of time, thattrying to stay universal is not likely to be helpful, in writing aboutreligion. We know well from our own field that truly helpful careercounseling depends upon defining the particularity or uniqueness ofeach person we try to help. No employer wants to know only what youhave in common with everyone else. He or she wants to know what makesyou unique and individual. As I have argued throughout this book, theidentification and inventory of your uniqueness or particularity iscrucial if you are ever to find meaningful work.This particularity invades and carries over to everything a persondoes; it is not suddenly jettison able when he or she turns toreligion. Therefore, when I or anyone else writes about religion Ibelieve we must write out of our own particularity- which starts, in mycase, with the fact that I write, and think, and breathe as a Christianas you might expect from the fact that I have been an ordainedEpiscopalian minister for the last forty-five years. Understandably,then, this article speaks from a Christian perspective. I want you tobe aware of that, at the outset.Balanced against this is the fact that I have always been acutelysensitive to the fact that this is a pluralistic society in which welive, and that I owe a great deal to my readers who may have religiousconvictions quite different from my own. It has turned out that thepeople who work or have worked here in my office with me, over theyears, have been predominantly of other faiths, mainly Jewish.Furthermore, Parachute's more than 7 million readers have not onlyincluded Christians of every variety and persuasion, ChristianScientists, Jews, members of the Baha'i faith, Hindus, Buddhists,adherents of Islam, but also believers in 'new age' religions,secularists, humanists, agnostics, atheists, and many others. I havetherefore tried to be very courteous toward the feelings of all myreaders, while at the same time counting on them to

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